Joy Cowley visits Holocaust Centre
Visit from our NZ Patron: Joy Cowley, OBE
Renown New Zealand children's author, Joy Cowley, visited our buttons recently to meet some of the children that took part in the project.

Award-winning writer Joy Cowley, OBE, patron of the NZ Children's Holocaust Memorial (the "button project") visited on 9 March 2014 for an afternoon tea with the children that took part in the button project and volunteers at the Centre.

 
Tell us your story
Tell us your story  info@holocaustcentre.org.nz
Your story will be treated as confidential unless you give us permission to publish it.

Preserving the memories of the survivors of the Holocaust is important.

Your story will be treated as confidential unless you give us permission to publish it. Click here to email us

 
Carol Ratnam on Children of the Holocaust

Children of the Holocaust

 

My whakapapa is that I am the daughter of Holocaust survivors. My mother was from the big city of Vienna and my father came from a small town in rural Poland – Wierzbnik.

Read more...
 
Beata Stoczynka, Polish Ambassador on Irena Sendler

Irena Sendler was a Polish nurse and social worker.

Read more...
 
Anna Paquin on Irena Sendler

Although I had knowledge of the Holocaust I had never heard of Irena Sendler until reading the script for this film.

Read more...
 
Holocaust research

Holocaust Centre of New Zealand

Yom Ha'Shoah, Commemoration Ceremony & Exhibition Launch "Auschwitz to Aotearoa"

Sunday, 27th April 7.00pm - 9.00pm, Myers Hall. Doors open at 6.30pm

 

Sunday, 27th April 7.00pm - 9.00pm, Myers Hall. Doors open at 6.30pm

 
candle_yom_hashoah-small
Yom Ha'Shoah is observed in commemoration of the six million Jewish men, women and children who perished during the Holocaust. A community commemoration ceremony will be held in conjunction with the Wellington Regional Jewish Council, Wellington Jewish Community Centre, Wellington Progressive Congregation, B'nai B'rith Wellington Unit and Wellington Council of Jewish Women.


The ceremony will be followed by the launch and preview of the exhibition "Auschwitz to Aotearoa". The exhibition depicts the lives of nine women who were all interned in concentration camps in Nazi Europe and later immigrated to New Zealand. Curated by Victoria University of Wellington graduate, Anna Chapman, the exhibition asks the question, "How did these women survive?"


Admittance by RSVP only to info@holocaustcentre.org.nz or 04 801 9480

by 20 April.

 

Call_for_Applicants2 

 Call for Applicants

Seminar for New Zealand Educators

International School for Holocaust Studies

Yad Vashem, Jerusalem, Israel

12 – 26 January, 2015

 

More Info

 

Upcoming talk

Between Liquidation and Liberation – The Last Jews of Europe in 1944

Dr. David Silberklang, Yad Vashem, Israel

Date: Thursday 1st May 2014
Time: 6.00pm - 8.00pm
 Venue: Myers Hall, 80 Webb Street, Wellington

On 1 May 2014 the Holocaust Centre of New Zealand will host David Silberklang for his talk "Between Liquidation and Liberation – The Last Jews of Europe in 1944".

This talk will examine the fine line between life and death, between liquidation and liberation, in a moment in time during the Holocaust – spring to fall 1944.

1944 was in many ways the beginning of the end for the remaining Jews of Europe, both as roundups for murder for many, and as liberation for some. As Jews were loaded onto trains to be killed in Auschwitz-Birkenau or taken to pits to be shot in 1944, some could hear Allied artillery thundering in the distance. 

In 1944, the Germans searched for every remaining Jew in their grasp in order to complete the job of the “Final Solution” before the war ended, while Allied troops from east and west systematically pushed back the Germans and began liberating place after place. 1944 was also the time when the Allies first learned details of the extermination camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau. For many Jews, frantic rescue efforts ensued in the hope of buying time until the expected Allied victory. For the last Jews of Europe, this was a moment of looming doom and glimmering hope.

For thousands of Jews still alive in Western Belarus, parts of the Baltic States, Western Ukraine, Eastern Poland, and parts of Western Europe, the summer and fall of this year (in the northern hemisphere) marked the beginning of liberation.  

Yet, this year also marked the beginning of the end for the Jews of Hungary, many Jews in Italy, the last Jews of the Lodz ghetto in Poland, the Jews of the Kovno and Shavli ghettos in Lithuania, many of the Jews who fought in the Polish and Slovak uprisings in August-September, the last Jews of Rhodes, Cos, and other Greek islands, and many more.

One Jewish person’s last moment was another’s moment of rescue. The talk will discuss that tension for Jews in 1944.

David Silberklang

Dr. David Silberklang

Dr. David Silberklang
David Silberklang is Senior Historian at the International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem, and Editor of the scholarly journal Yad Vashem Studies, as well as Series Editor of The Holocaust Survivors’ Memoirs Project.
He teaches Jewish History at the Rothberg International School of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at the University of Haifa graduate school, and has taught at Case Western Reserve University, the IDF College, and Tel Aviv University.
Dr. Silberklang also serves as Israel’s representative on the Academic Working Group of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (formerly known as the International Task Force).
Among his past functions at Yad Vashem, he served as Editor-in-Chief of Publications and as Chief Historian of Yad Vashem’s Museum Development Project. In the latter capacity he wrote the extensive conceptual historical outline that served as the basis for the content of the new Holocaust History Museum at Yad Vashem.
Dr. Silberklang has published widely on the Holocaust and his book, Gates of Tears: The Holocaust in the Lublin District of Poland will be published by Yad Vashem in March 2014.
David received his BA from Columbia University and his MA and PhD from the Hebrew University.

David Silberklang is Senior Historian at the International Institute for Holocaust Research at Yad Vashem, and Editor of the scholarly journal Yad Vashem Studies, as well as Series Editor of The Holocaust Survivors’ Memoirs Project.

He teaches Jewish History at the Rothberg International School of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and at the University of Haifa graduate school, and has taught at Case Western Reserve University, the IDF College, and Tel Aviv University. 

Dr. Silberklang also serves as Israel’s representative on the Academic Working Group of the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance (formerly known as the International Task Force). 

Among his past functions at Yad Vashem, he served as Editor-in-Chief of Publications and as Chief Historian of Yad Vashem’shas Museum Development Project. In the latter capacity he wrote the extensive conceptual historical outline that served as the basis for the content of the new Holocaust History Museum at Yad Vashem. 
Dr. Silberklang has published widely on the Holocaust and his book, Gates of Tears: The Holocaust in the Lublin District of Poland will be published by Yad Vashem in March 2014.

David received his BA from Columbia University and his MA and PhD from the Hebrew University.

 

 

We gratefully acknowledge the very generous support of the following organisations:

raye-freedman-trust

 

claims-conference

 

david-levene-foundation

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Visit the Centre

Note! The Centre will be closed in April for Passover and New Zealand public holidays on:

  • Tuesday 15th
  • Wednesday 16th
  • Friday 18th
  • Monday 21st
  • Tuesday 22nd
  • Friday 25th

The Holocaust Centre of New Zealand is open to the public from 10.00 am to 1.00 pm Sunday to Friday, and outside these hours by special arrangement. Admission is free, but donations are welcome.

Click here to book a group visit or a school group

The displays focus on Holocaust and New Zealand

You will see

  • Jewish life before and after the Holocaust.
  • Two parallel Timelines, events in Europe and the New Zealand response to these.
  • The experience of the Holocaust told through the stories of New Zealand Holocaust survivors.
  • A powerful video of a Holocaust survivor telling her story.
  • The story of philanthropists Annie and Max Deckston and the 20 Jewish orphans they brought to New Zealand in the 1930s.

Remember the dead and read the testimonies of survivors

Take time out to read the stories of Holocaust survivors in New Zealand.

 
BECOME A FRIEND

Become a friend of the Holocaust Centre of New Zealand

We have launched our wonderful new exhibition and learning centre, which has been enthusiastically received. If you have not already visited us we invite you to do so. We are sure you will find plenty to see and do here.


Download application form here